Accounts followed in Favor of term limits:

  1. https://twitter.com/ustermlimits
  2. https://twitter.com/COSProject
  3. https://twitter.com/OhioTermLimits
  4. https://twitter.com/Self_Governance
  5. https://twitter.com/ourgener
  6. https://twitter.com/CharlieDaniels
  7. https://twitter.com/tedcruz
  8. https://twitter.com/marcorubio
  9. https://twitter.com/RealBenCarson
  10. https://twitter.com/ChrisChristie

Accounts followed in Favor of not having term limits:

  1. https://twitter.com/SenSanders
  2. https://twitter.com/NRA
  3. https://twitter.com/USChamber
  4. https://twitter.com/AmerMedicalAssn
  5. https://twitter.com/nardotrealtor
  6. https://twitter.com/BlueCrossShield
  7. https://twitter.com/phrma
  8. https://twitter.com/Boeing
  9. https://twitter.com/ATT
  10. https://twitter.com/LockheedMartin

 

The supporters followed in favor of having term limits are groups or individuals with powerful voices that want to see “career-long” congress members removed from their positions. Many of the 2016 Republican primary election candidates have similar stances supporting congressional term limits. The groups chosen that support term limits do so for similar reasons. People and groups not in favor of term limits argue along several different lines to make their case. A central theme of these arguments is the subject of gridlock, and government inaction as a result of politicians who never leave. If new candidates had to come into office, they argue that it will be more likely to make the government actually function/get something done. Another argument used by this side is that when politicians constantly have to worry about being up for re-election (as a career politician does), that politician is more likely to focus on getting re-elected for as long as possible. This means that the politician will devote less efforts towards their job/duties and will be far more careful (not necessarily doing what they truly believe is right) all because they have to worry so frequently about being up for re-election.

The accounts followed which are in favor of not having term limits are either large companies or groups from professional fields that have strong lobbying  power. The interesting exception is Bernie Sanders who holds views contrary to the Republican primary candidates. It would have also been interesting to use this section of the assignment to follow a number of career/life-long politicians. Surely these politicians support no term limits on Congressional positions as they have made their job out of being elected, and holding Congressional positions. However, it is the large lobbyists that are most interested in keeping term limits away. Every time a lobbyist/lobbying group makes a contribution to a politician of any kind, it is in a way an investment to influence one of or all of this politician’s decisions and policies. Basically, the longer politicians hold office for, the deeper and more engaged of a relationship that politician will have with lobbyists. If there were term limits, lobbyists would need to start over their work every time a term expired, and a new politician came into the position. Medical, real estate, insurance, and business groups that have already invested a lot in lobbying and have accordingly seen policies which favor their business interests were chosen. Along with companies that have large government (particularly defense) contracts. In the end, large lobbying groups that have invested a lot already (often in specific long-time politicians) are against term limits as they do not want to lose the work they have already completed and start part of or the entire process over again.

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